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Seed oils best for lowering LDL cholesterol


Seed oils best for lowering LDL cholesterol

Lukas Schwingshackl, at the German Institute of Human Nutrition and colleagues, has found that seed oils were the best choice for people looking to improve their cholesterol. The researchers used an emerging technique called network meta-analysis to extract insight from published studies on the effect of various dietary oils on blood lipids. The study has been published in the Journal of Lipid Research this month.

At present, the research is clear about one thing that one has to exchange saturated fats with unsaturated fats in order to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, called LDL. Many of the studies establishing that mono- and polyunsaturated fats are better for blood lipids than saturated fats swapped out one food source at a time, making it hard to tell which of a plethora of vegetable oils might be most beneficial.

Read Also: Lower the LDL cholesterol level, lower is the risk to heart : JAMA

It is a fact that there has been no giant study comparing all available oils, therefore, Schwingshackl’s team constructed a network meta-analysis showing how different oils and solid fats have in fact been matched up. The researchers used sophisticated statistical tools to round up 55 studies dating to the 1980s that assessed the effects of consuming the same amount of calories from two or more different oils on participants’ blood lipids. The criterion for inclusion in the analysis was that a study had to compare the effect of two or more oils or fats (from a list of 13) on patients’ LDL, or other blood lipids like total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol or triglycerides, over at least three weeks.

The new statistical approaches of network meta-analysis allowed the team to infer a quantitative comparison between various saturated and unsaturated fats. Schwingshackl explained, “The beauty of this method is that you can compare a lot of different interventions simultaneously… and, in the end, you get a ranking. You can say, ‘this is the best oil for this specific outcome.'”

The final findings of the study indicate that

Solid fats like butter and lard are the worst choice for LDL. The best alternatives are oils from seeds. “Sunflower oil, rapeseed oil, safflower oil, and flaxseed oil performed best,” said Schwingshackl. “Some people from Mediterranean countries probably are not so happy with this result, because they would prefer to see olive oil at the top. But this is not the case.”

There are a few important caveats to the research. For starters, it measured only blood lipids. “This is not a hard clinical outcome,” said Schwingshackl. “LDL is a causal risk factor for coronary heart disease, but it’s not coronary heart disease.” However, he said, it might be difficult to conduct a study comparing those clinical outcomes — for starters, someone would need to find study participants willing to eat just one type of fat for years at a time.

Read Also: HDL cholesterol greater than 60 mg/dl increases risk of heart attack-ESC Update

The study had its limitations as meta-analyses run the risk of misleading by combining several pieces of low-confidence data into a falsely confident-sounding ranking. In this case, there was not enough evidence to choose a “winner” confidently among the seed oils. What’s more, the oils best at lowering LDL were not the most beneficial for triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. However, with the appropriate caveats in mind, Schwingshackl is optimistic about the potential for network meta-analysis to help researchers synthesize disparate clinical studies in the future.

For further reference follow the link: 10.1194/jlr.P085522

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Dr. Kamal Kant Kohli

Dr. Kamal Kant Kohli

A Medical doctor with a flair for writing medical articles. He joined Medical Dialogues as an Editor-in-Chief. He was the chairman of Anti-Quackery Committee in Delhi and worked with other Medical Councils of India. Email: drkohli@medicaldialogues.in. Contact no. 011-43720751
Source: With inputs from Journal of Lipid Research

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