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Mediterranean diet with extra virgin olive oil may control blood sugar without medicines in diabetes: Study


Mediterranean diet with extra virgin olive oil may control blood sugar without medicines in diabetes: Study

Spain: A Mediterranean diet with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) may help reduce blood sugar and keep type 2 diabetes patients off their diabetes medications, suggests a recent study.

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, found that the Mediterranean eating plan (Med-EatPlan) plus EVOO compared with low-fat diet delayed the need for new-onset blood-sugar-lowering medications in patients with type 2 diabetes.

The traditional Mediterranean pattern is characterized by a high intake of olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and cereals; a moderate intake of fish and poultry; a low intake of red meat, whole-fat dairy, and sweet desserts; and wine consumption with meals is allowed in moderation.

F. Javier Basterra-Gortari, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain, and colleagues examine the effects of two Mediterranean eating plans (Med-EatPlans) versus a low-fat eating plan on the need for blood sugar-lowering medications.

For the purpose, the researchers recruited 3,230 participants with type 2 diabetes from the Prevención con Dieta Mediterrànea (PREDIMED) trial. They were randomly assigned to the Med-EatPlan supplemented with EVOO, Med-EatPlan supplemented with mixed nuts or a low-fat eating plan.

Also Read: Mediterranean Diet during pregnancy may reduce risk of Gestational Diabetes

They then assessed (1) introduction of the first blood sugar lowering medication (oral or injectable) for participants on lifestyle management at enrollment and (2) insulin initiation. After a median follow-up of 3.2 years, the researchers found that:

  • After adjusting for baseline characteristics and propensity scores, the hazard ratios (HRs) of starting a first blood sugar-lowering medication were 0.78  for Med-EatPlan + EVOO and 0.89 for Med-EatPlan + nuts, compared with the control eating plan.
  • After a median follow-up of 5.1 years, the adjusted HRs of starting insulin treatment were 0.87 (0.68–1.11) for Med-EatPlan + EVOO and 0.89 (0.69–1.14) for Med-EatPlan + nuts compared with the control eating plan.

Also Read: Adherence to Mediterranean diet in early adulthood linked to better cognitive performance

“Our study results show that PREDIMED participants with type 2 diabetes who underwent an intervention with an energy-unrestricted MedEatPlan + EVOO had significantly lower rates of initiation of blood sugar-lowering medications,” concluded the authors.

To read the complete study follow the link: https://doi.org/10.2337/dc18-2475


Source: self

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