This site is intended for Healthcare professionals only.

Weight loss an effective intervention for urinary incontinence, finds study


Weight loss an effective intervention for urinary incontinence, finds study

USA: Obesity is associated with greater odds of lower urinary tract symptoms, according to a new study.

The central and general obesity are modifiable metabolic factors associated with lower urinary tract symptoms, including urinary incontinence (UI) in both men and women and overactive bladder syndrome (OBS) in women. The findings suggest that weight loss interventions could provide effective therapy for these patients.

The study has been published in the journal Urology.

H. Henry Lai, Division of Urologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and colleagues conducted Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN) study to describe the relationship between metabolic factors and lower urinary tract symptoms, OAB and UI.

For the purpose, the research team observed 920 adult patients who had lower urinary tract symptoms and who went to a LURN clinical centre for treatment between June 2015 and January 2017 (456 men; mean age, 59.1 years; 81.5% white). The lower urinary tract symptoms tool was used to assess these symptoms, which included the presence of overactive bladder syndrome, urinary incontinence, stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, urgency, frequency and nocturia.

Researchers then considered metabolic factors including central obesity (defined by waist circumference), general obesity (BMI 30 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 kg/m2), hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Associations between urinary symptoms and metabolic factors were examined with multivariable logistic regression.

Also Read: Prolonged sitting and physical inactivity linked to urinary tract symptoms

Key Findings:

  • 60.4% of the patients had central obesity per the Adult Treatment Panel III definition, 70.2% had central obesity per the International Diabetes Federation definition.
  • 43.4% had general obesity, 76.5% had overweight, 65.2% had hypertension, 31.5% had dyslipidemia and 17.1% had diabetes.
  • Central obesity (for each 10 cm larger waist) was associated with greater odds of urinary incontinence and urgency urinary incontinence in both men and women and stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome in women. Central obesity was also associated with frequency and nocturia.
  • General obesity (for each 5-unit increase in BMI) was associated with urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, urgency and frequency in both men and women, as well as with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome in women.

Also Read: New Sensor detects hidden urinary tract infection

“In patients, central and general obesity were key metabolic factors associated with UI in both males and females, and with OAB in females but not in males. The association between dyslipidemia and nocturia ≥2 needs further research,” concluded the authors.

For further reference follow the link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2018.09.012

Source: With inputs from Urology

Share your Opinion Disclaimer

Sort by: Newest | Oldest | Most Voted