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Study links Vitamin B1 deficiency to Stroke

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Study links Vitamin B1 deficiency to Stroke

The early analysis of data of an ongoing study by Dr Mansourian at the Vanderbilt Stallworth Rehabilitation Hospital has revealed that  10 per cent of stroke patients are thiamine deficient and 50 per cent are borderline deficient. Vitamin B1 is a vital vitamin for the development and maintenance of the nervous system.

Prior studies have shown that vitamin B1 deficiency is prevalent in people who suffer from alcoholism, gastrointestinal absorption disorders, HIV/AIDS, or a genetic deficiency. There is a high risk of development of symptoms like confusion, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, numbness, or others.

Read also: Early Thiamine supplementation reduces mortality in patients of septic shock

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Vitamin B1 is also known as thiamine which is which helps the body generate energy by converting carbohydrates.  especially it provides energy to the brain. Vitamin B1 is present in foods such as whole grain products such as bread, cereals, rice, and flour, Legumes and peas, nuts and seeds. It fulfils a crucial function in amino acid, fat and carbohydrate metabolism, and is critical to proper nervous system function. Rare diseases like Wernicke-Korsakoff, Leigh syndrome, nutritional optic neuropathy and maple syrup urine disease are associated with the body’s inability to utilize thiamine even with an adequate diet.

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Mansourian and his team are now conducting a retrospective analysis of 200 stroke patients over a one-year period. The study will evaluate thiamine levels and look at cognitive function, length of stay, balance and other variables, breaking the population down by the predominant probable causes. These include diuretic use, diet, high alcohol intake, celiac disease and gastric bypass.

The chief investigator of the study Vartgez Mansourian, MD, medical director of the Stroke Rehabilitation Program at Vanderbilt Stallworth Rehabilitation Hospital. feels that sometimes the deficiency is not detected by the doctors when someone with thiamine deficiency visits an emergency department. The doctor usually gives a glucose load which may result in metabolic encephalopathy. This may lead to unnecessary antipsychotic therapy.

The author further explains that symptoms of deficiency don’t approve a test in most ED settings. The test is offered only for those suffering from alcoholism, gastric bypass, or malnourishment but, not much is done at the ED level for a stroke-susceptible patient.

Fatigue is a common symptom after stroke. Prior studies have shown that fatigue related to stroke could be benefited from high-dose thiamine.

The investigator’s team is currently working on a year-long retrospective trial which is assessing 200 thiamine deficiency in 200 stroke patients and if the comorbid thiamine deficiency harms a patient’s recovery from stroke.

The investigator recommended that thiamine testing standard practice in both hospital and physician office settings.




Source: self

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