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Smoking increases the risk of heart failure : Study


Smoking increases the risk of heart failure : Study

Heart failure is a common condition and according to American Heart Association, on an average 1 of every 5 Americans over the age of 40 is susceptible to heart failure in their lifetime. Dr.Michael E. Hall,¬† at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, and colleagues conducted a study to evaluate the impact of smoking on heart conditions of African-Americans. The researchers have found that smoking increases the risk of heart failure among African-Americans. The study has been published in the American Heart Association’s journal¬†Circulation.

The study included 4,129 participants in the Jackson Heart Study with a median follow up of 8 years. At enrollment, none of the participants (average age 54) had heart failure or hardening of the arteries, which can lead to heart failure. Among participants, there were 2,884 people who never smoked, 503 who were current smokers and 742 who were former smokers. During the study period, there were 147 hospitalizations for heart failure.

“Previous research has focused on smoking and atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, but not enough attention has been given to the other bad effects of smoking on the heart,” said Michael E. Hall, M.D., M.S., a cardiologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson and senior study author. “With increasing rates of heart failure, particularly among African Americans, we wanted to look at the link between smoking and heart failure.”

The study found hospitalizations for heart failure were:

  • Nearly three times more likely among current smokers;
  • Three-and-a-half times more likely among current smokers who smoked a pack or more a day; and
  • Twice as likely among those with a smoking history equivalent to smoking a pack a day for 15 years.

Researchers also found a link between current smoking and a larger left ventricle, the heart’s main pumping chamber, which showed early signs that the left ventricle was not working properly. Hall said these changes in the left ventricle’s structure and function likely put a person at greater risk of developing heart failure.

Importantly, researchers did not find a link between former smokers and heart failure hospitalization or changes in the left ventricle.

The study took into account high blood pressure, diabetes, body mass and other factors that might have biased results. Researchers said the association between smoking, heart failure hospitalizations, and left ventricle changes remained even after also accounting for those participants who developed coronary heart disease during the study period.

Study limitations include the fact that the participants lived in only three counties in the Jackson, Mississippi metropolitan area, so findings may not be generalizable to African Americans living elsewhere.

“Still, the study clearly underscores the harms of smoking and the benefits of quitting,” Hall said. As healthcare professionals, we would recommend that all patients quit smoking anyway, but the message should be made even more forcefully to patients at higher risk of heart failure.”

For more details click on the link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.031912

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Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh Joined Medical Dialogue as Reporter in 2016. she covers all the medical specialty news in different medical categories. She also covers the Medical guidelines, Medical Journals, rare medical surgeries as well as all the updates in medical filed. She is a graduate from Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar University. She can be contacted at editorial@medicaldialogues.in Contact no. 011-43720751
Source: With inputs JAHA

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