This site is intended for Healthcare professionals only.

Obesity leads to delayed lactogenesis and difficulty in breastfeeding


Obesity leads to delayed lactogenesis and difficulty in breastfeeding

Typically, within 50 to 72 hours of giving birth, a woman will begin to secrete copious milk in a process called lactogenesis II. Infants of mothers who want to breastfeed but who have delayed lactogenesis II experience excessive weight loss and therefore are at high risk for formula supplementation.

A study led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, has found that delayed lactogenesis was more prevalent among women who were obese pre-pregnancy and that excessive gestational weight gain was also associated with a delay in lactogenesis II. The study has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation.

“Because nearly one in four women in the United States begins pregnancy with a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30, the study underscores the need for targeted interventions and support to help these women achieve their personal breastfeeding goals,” explains Spatz.

The following two tabs change content below.
Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh Joined Medical Dialogue as Reporter in 2016. she covers all the medical specialty news in different medical categories. She also covers the Medical guidelines, Medical Journals, rare medical surgeries as well as all the updates in medical filed. She is a graduate from Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar University. She can be contacted at editorial@medicaldialogues.in Contact no. 011-43720751
Source: Eureka Alert

Share your Opinion Disclaimer

Sort by: Newest | Oldest | Most Voted