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Albuminuria may also be a Biomarker for COPD


Albuminuria may also be a Biomarker for COPD

According to new research, Albuminuria, a commonly used biomarker of kidney disease may also indicate  COPD. The findings of study have been published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Dr Elizabeth C. Oelsner,  and coauthors report a link between albuminuria, the amount of the protein albumin in urine, and COPD. The researchers conducted their study by pooling information from 31,877 participants (average age: 60 years) from six cohort studies funded mainly by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

“The pulmonary microvasculature is critical to gas exchange and known to be impaired in patients with COPD, especially those with emphysema,” said Dr. Oelsner, Herbert Irving Assistant Professor of Medicine at Columbia University. “We wanted to test whether albuminuria, a non-invasive and commonly used clinical test, could serve as a marker for increased risk of developing chronic lower respiratory diseases, such as COPD and asthma.”

The researchers excluded participants who had been diagnosed with COPD or asthma upon enrollment in the studies. Participants were followed for changes in lung function over a median of 6 years and for respiratory hospitalizations and mortality over a median of 15 years.

The study found for each standard deviation increase in albuminuria, there was a:

  • 15 percent increase in those who developed moderate-to-severe COPD;
  • 26 percent increase in COPD hospitalizations and deaths; and
  • 3 percent greater decline in FEV1 (the amount of air that can be forcibly exhaled in one second) and an 11 percent greater decline in the ratio between FEV1 and FVC (the total amount of air that can be forcibly exhaled after taking the deepest breath possible). Both FEV1 and FEV1/FVC are important measures of lung function.

The researchers found that these associations remained significant even after taking into account smoking history, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Interestingly, while smoking is known to cause both endothelial damage and COPD, the results were found to be similar in never-smokers.

The study did not find a significant association between albuminuria and asthma.

The authors said that their findings suggest that endothelial damage in the lungs may play an important role in the development and progression of COPD. They added that the mechanisms behind that damage and behind microvascular dysfunction may present promising targets for new therapies designed to prevent or treat COPD.

Albuminuria indicates damage to the single layer of cells lining blood vessels, known as the endothelium, in the kidney. Previous studies have shown that this damage is associated with microvascular (small vessel) dysfunction throughout the body, including the lungs. However, according to the authors of the current study, no large-scale, prospective study has tested whether albuminuria is associated with the development of COPD.

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Hina
Hine Zahid Joined Medical Dialogue in 2017 with a passion to work as a Reporter. She covers all the stories related to Medical guidelines, Medical Journals, rare medical surgeries as well as all the updates in the medical field. Email: hina@medicaldialogues.in. Contact no. 011-43720751
Source: With inputs from American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

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  1. user
    Dr Sanjeev Babel October 2, 2018, 10:35 am

    Please give complete details of the original research paper