This site is intended for Healthcare professionals only.

A step further towards developing Gonorrhea vaccine


A step further towards developing Gonorrhea vaccine

Gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease whose numbers grow by 78 million new cases worldwide each year, is highly damaging to reproductive and neonatal health if untreated or improperly treated.Dr.Aleksandra Sikora of Oregon State University and Nicholas Noinaj of Purdue University have been able to provide key structural and functional insights into a multicomponent protein complex BAM on outer membrane of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae.This s being seen as a step further towards developing Gonorrhea vaccine.

The findings are especially important as Neisseria gonorrhoeae is considered a “superbug” because of its resistance to all classes of antibiotics available for treating infections.It can lead to endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, epididymitis and infertility. Babies born to infected mothers are at increased risk of blindness.

Research led by co-corresponding authors Aleksandra Sikora of Oregon State University and Nicholas Noinaj of Purdue University provides key structural and functional insights into a multicomponent protein complex known as BAM, short for beta-barrel assembly machinery.In Gram-negative bacteria, BAM is responsible for the biogenesis of beta-barrel proteins on the cells’ outer membranes.

Outer membrane proteins have crucial physiological and structural functions, among them nutrient acquisition, secretion, signal transduction, outer membrane biogenesis, and motility. In pathogenic bacteria, those proteins also lead to host colonization and can exploit immune responses, facilitating virulence.

BamA is the beta-barrel assembly machinery’s primary component, and this study took a look at two other components, BamD and BamE.

Researchers found that in N. gonorrhoeae, BamE is exposed on the cell surface but is not essential for cell viability. Conversely, BamD had the opposite traits: Not surface displayed, yet essential for viability.

However, when BamE was knocked out in experiments, BamD moved to the surface.

“The loss of BamE altered cell envelope composition and led to slower cell growth,” said Sikora, associate professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy. “It also led to an increase in both antibiotic susceptibility and the formation of membrane vesicles containing greater amounts of vaccine antigens.”

Sikora noted that both BamD and BamE are expressed in diverse gonococcal isolates and throughout different phases of growth.

“The solved structures of Neisseria BamD and BamE share overall folds with E. coli proteins but there are also differences that may be important for function,” she said. “So even though BAM is conserved across Gram-negative bacteria, there are structural and functional differences from species to species that can likely be exploited in developing species-specific therapeutics to combat multidrug resistance.”

For example, in E. coli, BamE is not surface exposed; also, the absence of BamE in E. coli does not lead BamD to become displayed on the outer membrane.

“That’s further evidence that BamE may be a new vaccine target against N. gonorrhoeae,” Sikora said. “We did a lot of biology as well as structure solving that give us tools for enabling new therapies. In the battle against multidrug resistance, the ideal way of preventing disease is a vaccine, and having a structure of BamE opens the door to a structural vaccinology approach.”

For more details click on the link : http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA117.000437

The following two tabs change content below.
Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh

Anjali Nimesh Joined Medical Dialogue as Reporter in 2016. she covers all the medical specialty news in different medical categories. She also covers the Medical guidelines, Medical Journals, rare medical surgeries as well as all the updates in medical filed. She is a graduate from Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar University. She can be contacted at editorial@medicaldialogues.in Contact no. 011-43720751
Source: Eureka Alert

Share your Opinion Disclaimer

Sort by: Newest | Oldest | Most Voted